Idiopathic Issues

What happened to HGE?

Posted by Flavia Vaduva on December 26, 2018 at 4:12 PM
Flavia Vaduva
Flavia Vaduva is a general practice Veterinarian and product manager for VetPrep. She has a passion for veterinary medicine, education and business management. She really enjoys interacting with veterinary students and veterinary professionals. She spends her free time riding horses and traveling to explore new places!
BlogHeader-What-happened-to-HGE
 
Hemorrhagic gastroenteritis has been renamed...it is now called Acute Hemorrhagic Diarrhea Syndrome (AHDS). 
 
AHDS is a more specific term, as HGE could refer to a number of conditions that cause inflammation and bleeding of the gastrointestinal tract. Other conditions that may lead to HGE  include but are not limited to: infectious causes, dietary indiscretion and pancreatitis among others. 
 
So what are some top fast facts about AHDS?
1.On PCV/TP, you can expect an elevated hematocrit with a normal or low total protein 
  • Dr. Wendy Brooks states, “The average AHDS patient will have a PCV of at least 57%. (It will even be greater than 60% in approximately 30% of patients).” (1)
  • It is a good idea to include repeat PCV/TP’s on your treatment plan so you can recheck and make sure it is trending towards normal over the course of treatment 
2. Fluids, fluids, fluids are your friend! 
  • Though there may be variability in clinical presentation, many AHDS cases require aggressive intravenous fluid therapy (along with many other supportive care measures) to try to avoid hypovolemic shock 
3. This condition requires close monitoring 
  • The often acute nature of AHDS means your patients’ condition can progress quickly so monitor closely, assess often and make changes as needed to ensure the best possible outcome. Most patients require a few days of hospitalization so set your patient up for success by offering referral to a 24 hour facility if your hospital does not overnight capabilities.
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References: 
  1. Acute Diarrhea Hemorrhagic Syndrome. VIN. Retrieved from Vin.com
  2. Cote, Etienne. Clinical Veterinary Advisor. St. Louis, MO: Mosby Elsevier.

Topics: HGE

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