Idiopathic Issues

Rescuing Wildlife

Posted by Jessica Gramlich on August 21, 2015 at 8:00 AM
Jessica Gramlich
Dr. Gramlich is a 2008 graduate of North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine. After completing a one-year emergency internship in Rhode Island, she spent five years working as a small animal general practitioner in New Hampshire.

SwiftI am the granddaughter of a wildlife rehabilitator. After a career in the military my grandfather, a World War II and Korean War Veteran retired from the Army and joined the US Fisheries and Wildlife Service. He soon became an integral player in the Bald Eagle Reintroduction Project in the state of Maine. To say that I am proud of my grandfather’s accomplishments is an understatement. As a kid I didn’t realize how important his job was, the coolest part about having a grandfather who rescued wildlife was that visiting my grandparents meant checking out all of the cool animals in the barn. He always had an array of birds, transiently living there until they could be returned back to the wild.  He had owls, hawks, ospreys, and herons on a constant rotation.  Seeing those birds up close and personal was absolutely formative to my early childhood love of animals and planted the seed that I would one day grow up to help animals for a living too. I’ve run into many people over the years, most notably a medical doctor, who sighted concepts like “survival of the fittest” as a reason to not help animals.

I think this is a really cool article that highlights the importance of saving a species that humans often find unnecessary to our own agenda.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/16/magazine/rescuing-wildlife-is-futile-and-necessary.html?_r=0

Topics: rehabilitation, wildlife

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