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7 Equine Nutrition Tips for Vet Students

Posted by Cathy Barnette on May 28, 2020 at 1:36 PM

While small animal nutrition is relatively straightforward (“just feed a high-quality balanced diet and everything will be fine!”), equine nutrition is more complex. Nutritional quality of grass and hay can vary significantly; because forage constitutes the majority of a horse’s diet, it can be challenging to ensure that horses are receiving adequate nutrition.

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Topics: Equine

Diet-Associated Dilated Cardiomyopathy: FAQs for Vet Students

Posted by Cathy Barnette on May 18, 2020 at 11:20 AM

In 2018, veterinary cardiologists began to observe and report an increased incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in breeds not normally predisposed to that condition.

On July 12, 2018, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a press release stating that they were formally investigating a connection between “pet foods containing peas, lentils, other legume seeds, or potatoes as main ingredients” and dilated cardiomyopathy DCM in dogs.1

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Topics: Vet Student, Diet, Dilate Cardiomyopathy

Pet Food Label Summary for Vet Students

Posted by Cathy Barnette on May 11, 2020 at 8:29 AM

Pet food labels can provide a lot of helpful information, if you know where to look! Unfortunately, the information that first catches your eye (and the eyes of your clients) is often the least helpful.

Labels often contain extensive marketing claims that are relatively devoid of meaning. It’s important for you and your clients to look past this information, in order to determine what’s actually relevant on the label.  

There are two required pieces of information on a pet food label: the principal display panel and the information panel. Each of these panels is required to contain specific information about the pet food.

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Topics: Pet Food Label

Walking Veterinary Clients Through Critical Decisions

Posted by Cathy Barnette on April 26, 2020 at 7:25 PM

As a veterinarian, you will frequently find yourself helping clients through difficult decisions. 

  • Is it time to euthanize my pet?
  • Should I pursue this expensive treatment for my pet?
  • Which treatment approach is best for my pet’s disease? 

These are just a few examples, but you will likely see many others.

Clients faced with difficult decisions will often ask for your help and support. Even though the decision is fundamentally theirs, your words and actions can help them arrive at a decision that they can be at peace with.

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Topics: Clients, Client Situations, Veterinary Clients, Client Communications

 

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