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When is it Appropriate to Fire a Veterinary Client?

Posted by Cathy Barnette on April 20, 2020 at 12:14 PM

At its heart, veterinary medicine is a customer-focused business. Animals can’t drive themselves to the veterinary clinic for care; therefore, we must appeal to their owners to ensure that our patients receive the level of care that they need. 

In the name of client service, all members of the veterinary team are expected to tolerate a wide variety of client requests and behaviors. Sometimes, however, these requests or behaviors cross the line from merely annoying to downright hostile or abusive. 

What options does a veterinarian have in that case? Is it actually possible to fire a client?

Fortunately, it is!

Firing a client is a very rare occurrence, but it is an option in extreme cases.

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Topics: Clients, Client Situations, Veterinary Clients, Client Communications, Fire Client

Difficult Client Interactions: 5 Tips for Vet Students

Posted by Cathy Barnette on April 17, 2020 at 12:00 PM

You know what surprised me most when I first became a practicing veterinarian? The number of challenging client interactions I experienced. 

I had this idea in my mind that I would be helping people’s pets and they would appreciate my efforts. Unfortunately, as I soon learned, that isn’t always the case!

Veterinary clinics are emotional places. Even seemingly mild medical issues, like a torn toenail or a cat’s diarrhea, can trigger significant emotional responses in clients. Add in the additional stress caused by unanticipated expenses and this can create a recipe for challenging, confrontational interactions. 

Ultimately, your ability to handle these difficult interactions is just as valuable as your medical knowledge. Here are some tips that will help!

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Topics: Clients, Client Situations, Veterinary Clients, Client Communications

Constant Rate Infusions in Small Animal Veterinary Medicine

Posted by Cathy Barnette on March 26, 2020 at 3:26 PM

Constant rate infusions (CRIs) are used to manage a wide variety of conditions in veterinary medicine. Their use is especially beneficial in drugs with a short half-life.

By removing the need for frequent redosing, a CRI makes drug administration easier and less prone to error.

Even drugs with long half-lives, however, may be delivered via CRI to maximize clinical benefits while minimizing the risk of side effects.

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Topics: Small Animals, Constant Rate Infusions, Calculations

Fluid Therapy Tips for Vet Students

Posted by Cathy Barnette on March 9, 2020 at 9:00 AM

Intravenous fluids are used to treat a number of different conditions, including shock, hypovolemia, and dehydration. In general small animal practice, however, one of the most common use of IV fluids is to treat dehydration or ongoing fluid losses in a hospitalized patient. 

Providing optimal fluid therapy requires careful selection of fluid type, as well as determining an appropriate fluid rate. Additionally, it’s important to be aware of the risks that can accompany IV fluid therapy, so that you can minimize the likelihood of complications and detect complications promptly if they do occur.

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Topics: Vet Student, Fluid Therapy

 

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